Joe Gitterman

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about the artist
statement
about the series
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overview

The lines of a dancer’s body are often Gitterman’s source material. With that as inspiration, his works set out to capture a fleeting moment of arrested motion in bronze, cooper or aluminum.

His choice of material inevitably informs the finished product as the patina, color and even the thickness of various metals contribute to how the action is captured and translated.

Viewing Gitterman’s realistic nudes in proximity with his abstractions offer a fascinating insight into his creative process. As one moves between them, similarities of curves and repetition of gesture begin to emerge. Suddenly seemingly purely abstract pieces become imbued with human qualities.

Many of the artist’s bronzes are remarkably complex, with fold bending over fold, painted color meeting burnished surface, and edges inviting the viewer deeper into the heart of the piece. As the shapes evolve, so do the patinas and surfaces. Repose is transformed into possibility. Often when viewing a number of similar works in series, a single movement suddenly seems to reveal its full range of motion as the eye moves from one piece to the next.

Most recently, Joe has been working with polished stainless steel. The inherent stark contrasts available to him by mixing mirrored surface with dazzling color have led him to minimize the forms themselves, lest the exposition of the movement be drowned out by too much visual noise. The resultant works are striking in both their simplicity and their dazzling surfaces.

Line, surface, form: these are the elements that form the vocabulary of Gitterman’s work. His language is an abstraction of gesture frozen in mid-flight. But the finished works speak to us in the graceful language of dance.

— Northwest CT Arts Council April 2011


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about the artist

Born: New York City
Education: University of Virginia, Columbia University
Basically self taught - attended:
Pratt Institute, The New School, Art Students League, all in NYC.

Using aluminum, copper, sheet metal, bronze, plaster and wax materials, my work explores the relationship between surface, texture, space and movement.

Much of my inspiration comes from the motion of modern and classical dance.

Although I have worked most often to date in relatively small-scale pieces appropriate for interior spaces, many of my sculptures are also scaled for outdoor installations. I look forward to continuing my exploration of how both familiar sculptural materials, as well as new ones, can be used to help redefine their possibilities in conveying an innovative perception of surface, space and movement.


artist statement

“My sculpture examines the relationship between fixed form and movement: each sculpture attempts to suggest the transformation that is possible. I am greatly influenced by the human body, specifically the shapes, gestures, and momentary poses created by dancers.

“Through observation and sketches, I conceive a visual image of a motion and attempt to infuse that motion into three-dimensional material. My sculptures are an abstraction of gesture frozen in mid flight.”

about the series

FOLDED FORM
The enlargements, 1 & 2, are made out of sheets of metal that have been mechanically bent and then finished with patina(1) or powder coated (2). Folded Form 4 is the bronze Maquette for No. 2. Number 3 is made from a wax original in the lost wax process

Powder Coating is an electrical process that makes “paint” adhere to metal creating a surface that can withstand the elements.

Patina, in this case, is a heat and chemical process that creates color and texture.

Lost Wax process simply makes a fire proof cast around the wax image that has had wax “pipes” added to it so that when the wax is melted away molten bronze can be pored into the created space and thus make the reproduction of the wax image in bronze.

DANCE
These pieces are made first in sheet wax, then cast in bronze, using the lost wax process, finished with my unique patina, and then hand rubbed with wax.

DUO
These works are originally created as wax, cardboard, or paper maquettes. Mirrored stainless steel sheets are then worked on bending-rolling machines to replicate the maquettes before being partially powder coated.

GESTURE
These works are originally created as wax, cardboard, or paper maquettes. Mirrored stainless steel sheets are then worked on bending-rolling machines to replicate the maquettes before being partially powder coated.

MOVEMENT
Each piece is made first in wax and then cast in bronze by the lost wax process. I polish them on a machine, then hand paint the highlights. The final step is coating the sculpture with polyurethane to ensure that it retains its reflective luster.

TORSO
Each piece is made in wax and then cast in bronze by the lost wax process, finished with my unique patina, and then hand rubbed with wax.

POISED
The aged copper is hand formed.

Artisan Direct, Limited. 82 Callingham Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. Telephone 585-586-3535, Fax 585-586-8555, e-mail: info at artisan direct L T D dot net
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